Disappearing Rio Grande: The Devils Problem

The Texas Tribune

The color of the Devils River changes with depth from light and clear to dark blue. Photo by: Jessica Lutz

The color of the Devils River changes with depth from light and clear to dark blue. Photo by: Jessica Lutz

The Devils River flows clear as gin before it enters Lake Amistad and joins the Rio Grande. It’s the cleanest river in Texas, supports endangered fish and birds and is home to plants found nowhere else in the state.

It's less than 70 miles long and is arguably the most protected river in Texas. But despite the 38,000 acres of state natural area and the 160,000 acres of land and conservation easements along its banks that are held by the Texas chapter of The Nature Conservancy, a supporter of this project, the river’s most crucial aspect is not safeguarded. 

“If we protect the whole river basin but we have not protected the aquifer, it may not be enough,” said Nature Conservancy biologist John Karges. 

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